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City of North Myrtle Beach News

Posted on: July 20, 2021

Results -- July 19 City Council Meeting

NMB City Council - April 5 2021 - FINAL - Reduced

RESULTS – JULY 19 NORTH MYRTLE BEACH CITY COUNCIL MEETING AGENDA

The North Myrtle Beach City Council met on Monday, July 19, for an Executive Session (6:00 pm) and a Meeting (7:00 pm).

-- During the executive session, City Council discussed a potential property acquisition and received a legal briefing regarding the First Amendment. City Council took no action.'

-- During the meeting, a Proclamation signed by Mayor Marilyn Hatley was presented to the City's parks and recreation staff, declaring the month of July as National Parks & Recreation Month. 

Parks and recreation are vitally important to establishing and maintaining the quality of life in communities, ensuring the health of all citizens, and contributing to the economic and environmental well-being of a community and region. 

Parks and recreation programs build healthy, active communities that aid in the prevention of chronic disease, provide therapeutic recreation services, and provide opportunities to improve the mental and emotional health of all citizens. Parks and recreation programs also increase a community’s economic prosperity through increased property values, expansion of the local tax base, increased tourism, the attraction and retention of businesses, and crime reduction.

Parks and natural recreation areas ensure the ecological beauty of our community and provide a place for children and adults to connect with nature and recreate outdoors. 

-- Dr. Marilyn Fore, President of Horry-Georgetown Technical College, gave a presentation on the college. 

Horry-Georgetown Technical College (HGTC) is a two-year community/technical college that offers more than 65 associate degree, diploma, and certificate programs for students who are either seeking quick entry into the workforce or desiring to transfer to a senior institution to pursue a bachelor's degree.

HGTC offers three convenient campus locations in South Carolina, including Myrtle Beach, Conway, and Georgetown. The college offers educational programs for nearly every career interest, from Business and Health Science to Natural Resources and Information Technology.

To learn more about Horry-Georgetown Technical College, please visit https://www.hgtc.edu/ 

-- City Council appointed Emily Tinsley to the Tree City Board. Emily is a 10-year resident of North Myrtle Beach, a member of the Driftwood Garden Club, and comes from a tree farming family.

-- City Council approved a special event permit for the March 26, 2021, Run North Myrtle Beach and Surfboard Half and Flip Flop 5K Marathon.

-- City Council passed second (final) reading of an ordinance annexing and zoning (Single-Family Residential Low-Density R-1) 0.46 acres on Riverside Drive identified by PIN 311-16-04-0013. 

-- City Council held the second public hearing on a proposed Development Agreement between the City and NVR, Inc. regarding the proposed Hope Pointe Planned Development District (PDD), formerly known as the Esperanza PDD.

The core terms of the proposed Development Agreement are as follows:

The initial term of the Development Agreement is for a period of five years. The term will automatically renew at the end of five years for two more terms of five years each, if the developer is not in default and the project is not complete. 

The project will consist of not less than 220 residential units and not more than 260 residential units as approved under the proposed PDD and Master Site Plan. 

The developer agrees not to subject any portion of the property to a conservation easement or other restrictive covenant regarding any of the property shown as single-family homes or amenities on the Master Site Plan.

The developer will provide temporary storm drainage measures to the satisfaction of the City’s public works director until such time that the storm drainage facilities that are a part of the development work are completed. 

The developer will mow the property no less than four times per year until the PDD is fully developed. The mowing will occur in the periods between April 1 and October 31 of each year. 

The developer will pay the City $400,000 in increments of $50,000 for each of the eight phases due at the time of submittal of a preliminary plat for each phase. In the event that on the tenth business day following the fifth anniversary of the development agreement the entire $400,000 is not paid, the developer will pay to the City the difference between the total of the amounts previously paid to the City and $400,000. 

The developer will also pay to the City a beach access fee of $1,100 per residential unit and a park enhancement fee of $200 per residential unit for a total of $1,300 per unit, due at the time of issuance of the building permit. If on the tenth business day following the fifth anniversary of the agreement the total amount of park and beach fees is less than $375,000, the developer will pay an additional amount equal to the difference between the amounts previously paid and the greater of $375,000 or an amount equal to $1,300 per residential unit. (This guarantees the payment of at least $375,000.) 

The developer will provide a completed swimming pool accessible by the project residents prior to the issuance of 151 residential units. 

The developer will provide a turn lane into the property within the public right-of-way of Little River Neck Road in accordance with the traffic recommendation of the City’s public works director.

-- City Council passed the first reading of an ordinance pertaining to a Development Agreement between the City and NVR, Inc. regarding the Hope Pointe PDD, formerly known as the Esperanza PDD.

-- City Council passed the first reading of an ordinance to amend the Esperanza Planned Development District (PDD) revising it to the Hope Pointe PDD.

Adjacent to Tidewater Plantation on Little River Neck Road, the Esperanza PDD was entitled in 2007. The originally approved PDD contained a variety of residential products – single-family homes, townhouses, multiplexes, and multi-family condominiums. 

Other features of the original PDD included amenity areas, a community marina with 50 slips on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, and a commercial area meeting the standards of the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) district at the front of the property on Little River Neck Road. 

The density of the original PDD was limited to 375 dwelling units, and the project provided 27.7% open space. 

Except for the boat slips on the Intracoastal Waterway, no portion of the entitled PDD is constructed. An existing unused residence remains on the property. 

The applicant, DDC Engineers, agent for the developer, has requested an amendment to the Esperanza PDD revising the project into Hope Pointe. The amendment reduces the overall density from 375 dwelling units to 250 dwelling units and removes the previously approved multiplex and multi-family uses from the development (3.81 dwelling units per acre, down from 5.71 dwelling units per acre previously). 

Townhomes replace the neighborhood commercial area adjacent to Little River Neck Road. The remaining commercial component of the PDD is a proposed retail ship store on the Intracoastal Waterway, near the existing community marina, which will be no larger than 5,000 square feet. This retail element is to be complete prior to the issuance of 50% of the building permits for residential units within the project. 

The existing community marina will continue as a private marina limited in use to Hope Pointe property owners, and the development provides an amenity area and overlook park for residents. Total open space is 47.5%, a nearly 70% increase from the existing PDD. 

The proposed development largely follows the previously created road network and winds around the existing wetlands on the site. 

One hundred and forty-six townhomes are located at the front of the property adjacent to Little River Neck Road, and 104 single-family lots complete the residential portion of the development with typical dimensions of 52-feet by 120-feet. 

A standard 20-foot perimeter project setback applies throughout the project, except that portion of the property abutting Tidewater Plantation and Little River Neck Road. A 40-foot minimum perimeter buffer runs along the Tidewater Plantation property line, with the first 25 feet consisting of a year-round vegetated screen. A 40-foot landscaped setback runs along Little River Neck Road. 

Architecturally, the original Esperanza PDD reflects a Mediterranean coastal village theme with stucco or brick exteriors and tiled roofing. The Hope Point PDD revises this architectural style to reflect a traditional coastal southern style using stucco, brick, stone, and a variety of siding types – horizontal lap, board and batten, and cedar shake – with architectural shingles or standing seam metal roofing. 

Street standards conform to City standards with a 50-foot right-of-way with sidewalks and street trees and 22-foot driveways for access to the townhome portions of the development.

-- City Council passed the first reading of an ordinance pertaining to a petition to annex and zone (Single-Family Residential Low-Density R-1) 0.75 acres on Old Crane Road identified by PIN 350-06-01-0137. The subject area is Residential Suburban on the City’s Future Land Use Map, and the request is consistent with the City’s comprehensive plan.

-- To review the entire July 19 meeting packet, please visit here: https://www.nmb.us/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_07192021-201?html=true  If the link does not work for you, please visit https://www.nmb.us/ and click on Agendas & Minutes.

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